Village of Unadilla

IMG 56291Village of Unadilla
Clerk's Office
770 G Street
Unadilla, NE 68454
Phone: (402) 828-5355
Barbara Wilhelm - Clerk
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Office Hours:
Monday - Friday

8:30AM to 1:00PM

 

 


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"When looking at all the towns platted in Otoe County during the 1860s, it is a wonder that Unadilla has survived. Paisley, to the west, and Nursery Hill, to the east, met their demise before the turn of the century.
 
In 1864 James Wallen and his family claimed the 24th homestead in the county and established a "half-way house" which served freighters on the Nebraska City cut-off route. It was immortalized under another name in the novel "Nebraska Coast" by Clyde Brion Davis.
 
Strite and Catherine Axtell, having "inside information" on the path of the railroad, platted and recorded a town in May 1871. Mrs. Axtell is said to have borrowed the name from Unadilla, New York. "Unadilla" is an Iroquois Indian word meaning "a place of meeting." William Saunders built the first house, which was on the site now occupied by Lempka Recycling. Almost due south, on the bank of the Little Nemaha, Saunders built a dam to provide power for the Unadilla Roller Mills.
 
The school district was organized in 1871, with classes held in a building near the town site. A school was built in 1872 near where the Methodist Church now stands.
 
The Missouri Pacific Railroad tracks entered Unadilla approximately 1,000 feet south of the Saunders' residence. Crossing the south road, it makes a wide curve and exits the town in a north westerly direction. Following the grade of the tracks, main street was also laid out along the curved line.
 
A post office was established in April, 1872, as were two small general stores, and a blacksmith shop. However, while there was a siding at this location, no depot was built. A depression, which gripped the nation in 1873, made for "tight money" all along the new line. In 1874 the people collected what they could and built their own depot and a stockyard, which they donated to the railroad. It soon became known for "top prices" for cattle and grain. An elevator was built in 1880, which handled 90,000 bushels of grain the following year. Large amounts of stone from a nearby quarry were also shipped by rail.
 
Sunday services met in John Abbott's store in 1873. The first church was built in 1879, with a Methodist church completed in 1899. Numerous fraternal organizations provided cultural and financial support for the community. These include the Order of Good Templars (1874), the Building and Loan (1879), the Equitable Aid Union (1881), and the Mutual Aid Association (1882). A literary association was established in 1881, and a cornet band, best known and long affiliated with the community, was organized in 1879.
 
Unadilla grew in spurts. In 1888, when the Bank of Unadilla was formed, the population hovered around 300. The 1900 census listed only 243 residents. After numerous small floods, which were blamed on the mill dam, it was blown up. A few years later, in 1908, an even larger flood did $20,000 damage and took six lives. The drop to 209 residents in 1910 was attributed to the flooding. The town gradually moved north to higher ground.
 
Telephones were introduced in 1901 and a water system was installed in 1905. However, no fire department was initiated at that time. In 1911, a disastrous fire destroyed all the businesses, with the exception of Horstman & Parker's Grocery and the bank.
 
The restoration of Unadilla during the next two years were a tribute to the unity of the community. Residents pitched in to help clean up and build temporary shelters. While a number of businesses suggested relocating to the block north (so the buildings could "line up straight") the majority were rebuilt along the original curved street. Soon new buildings were completed, and a full line of services, which had been available in Unadilla since its inception, were again in place.
 
Unadilla's population remained constant until the end of World War II when the town again began to grow. Now boasting a population of nearly 300, a new Methodist Church was built in 1990, and an elementary school was completed in 1991.
 
Unadilla celebrated its centennial in 1971. Since then an annual birthday party has been held in June with a picnic, ball games, and other festivities. In January 1988, the Lt. Governor signed a proclamation declaring Unadilla "Groundhog Capital of Nebraska." It is celebrated with a Wild Game fee, and (weather permitting) a parade."
 
By Barb Wilhelm, local historian, Rt. 1 Box 161, Unadilla, NE 68454. (1)
 
 
Cemeteries:
 
Hopewell Cemetery
 
Pleasant Hill Cemetery
 
Unadilla Cemetery
 
 
Churches:
 
Unadilla-Townshipelement380Hopewell Presbyterian Church
Rt. 1
Unadilla, NE 68454
 
472 F St.
Unadilla, NE 68454
(402)269-2161
 
 
History:
 
 
 
Unadilla-Townshipelement400Libraries:
 
770 G Street
Unadilla, NE 68454-0098
Phone: (402) 828-4655
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Publications:
 
"Unadilla Residents"
 
This publication includes a variety of information on residents of the village of Unadilla, as compiled by Unadilla Historian, Barbara Wilhelm.  Barbara's work covers over two decades worth of work on her part, compiling 358 pages worth of information on over 1000 surnames from the village of Unadilla, Nebraska over the past 100 years.  Information was taken from cemetery records, town newspaper listings and announcements, etc.
 
To see if your Unadilla ancestors might be listed in this manuscript, we have enclosed a 'Surname Index' document below.
 
 
 
 
 
 
This manuscript is available on CD-ROM for $15.00 ($10.00 for the CD-ROM itself, and $5.00 for shipping and handling).  If you are interested in purchasing one, please send a check or money order to:
 
Otoe County Genealogical Society
P.O. Box 465
Syracuse, NE 68446
 
 
Web Links:
 
 
 
 
Works Cited:
 

(1) CASDE | Burr -- Otoe County." CASDE | Virtual Nebraska. University of Nebraska - Lincoln, 2005. Web. 23 October 2010.

Village of Talmage

IMG 2752507 5th Street
Talmage, NE 68448
Phone: (402) 264-3715
Carol Bruggeman - Clerk
 
Office Hours:
Tuesdays & Thursdays

8:00AM to 12:00PM

 

 


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"Talmage is near the southern border of Otoe County, just off of Nebraska Highway 67 and about twenty miles from Nebraska City, Syracuse, Tecumseh and Auburn.  An agricultural area, it lies within the Nemaha  River valley near Spring Creek, Wilson Creek and the south Branch of the Little Nemaha.  This area was selected by early pioneer settlers for its  fertility and resources.
 
The early farmers in our community were nearly all Germans who immigrated from their native land or moved here from settlements in nearby states.  Following the Civil War, discharged soldiers came west looking for homesteads.  By 1880 many people had made their home in the area.  Getting their crops to market became a problem.  The Missouri-Pacific Railroad started to build a line from Kansas City to Omaha.  Land was donated by Clark Puffer so a town  could be built near the planned railroad depot.  The first train arrived in March 1882 with a load of lumber and a caboose for passengers.
 
The town was founded (platted) on March 2, 1882 with many lots sold.  The population by 1895 reached between 800 and 900 and was described as ‘upright, industrious, reliable and public spirited’ by the editor of The Talmage Tribune (Vol 14 No.43)." (1)
 
 
Cemeteries:
 
Biggs Cemetery
 
Fairview Cemetery
 
St. John's UCC (McWilliams) Cemetery
 
St. Paul's Lutheran Cemetery
 
St. Paul's UCC (Osage) Cemetery
 
Schacht Cemetery
 
 
Talmage-Townshipelement331Churches:
 
Charter Oak Christian Church
Talmage, NE 68448
 
Talmage-Townshipelement332Faith Lutheran Church
108 Carol St.
Talmage, NE 68448
(402) 264-2425
 
Talmage-Townshipelement333St. John's United Church of Christ
4403 'O' Rd.
Talmage, NE 68448
(402) 259-4215
 
Talmage-Townshipelement330Zion United Church of Christ
302 Carol St.
Talmage, NE 68448
(402) 264-2965
 
 
History:
 
 
 
Talmage-Townshipelement341Organizations:
 
American Legion Post #246
Talmage, NE 68448
 
Talmage-Townshipelement340405 Main St.
Talmage, NE, 68448
(402) 264-3875
 
 
 
Publications:
 
Talmage History (1882 - 2007)
 
The Talmage History book was compiled by members of the Talmage community and is currently being offered to the public by the Talmage Area Action Group (TAAG).  This book covers Talmage's 125 year-old history from its very beginning in 1882, when Talmage became a major stopping point for the Missouri-Pacific rail line, and concludes in 2007. The book hosts 128 pages dedicated to the history of this prosperous Otoe County community, 172 pages of family biographies, and 154 pages worth of photographs of Talmage's citizens and facilities throughout its history.
 
This book is available for $42.00 ($30.00 for the book itself, and $12.00 for shipping and handling).  If you are interested in purchasing one, please contact Elaine Hauberg with the Talmage Area Action Group at: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..
 
 
 
Works Cited:
 

(1) Rohlfing, Alma. "Talmage Biography." (2009). Print.

 

City of Syracuse

tyytyuhythr495 Midland Street
Syracuse, NE 68446
Phone: (402) 269-2173
Peggy Hobscheidt - Clerk
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Office Hours:
Monday through Friday

8:00AM to 4:30PM

 


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"Syracuse had an unusual origin. The name appears at a site southeast of Unadilla in 1856, nearly six miles west of its present location where salt was discovered. To claim the land, the "Syracuse Town Company" was formed. Named for the great salt entity in New York, it was hoped that a similar market would develop. Salt mining was not successful and it soon died down, but the name was not forgotten.
 
A 'postal drop' established at a farm in Syracuse precinct was lost in 1863 when another man acquired the office and moved it to his place of business on "Nursery Hill," west of our present location. Some historians suggest that present-day Syracuse was an outgrowth of that settlement. However, those observations are not entirely correct, since the earlier Syracuse postal address was moved to Nursery Hill, it was not the predecessor -- only an interim step.
 
The first root for the present town of Syracuse was planted in the late 1850s when a school was established. It continued as settlement increased. In 1869, when talk of a railroad coming through the area got serious, a Mr. Thorn gave 100 acres of land to the Midland Pacific Railway, and Dr. J. N. Converse and L.E. Sinsabaugh laid out a town. In 1871, when the railroad was completed to Lincoln, the station was given the name 'Syracuse.'
 
The importance of the railroad was immediately felt. As Syracuse became a major shipping point in the county, buildings sprang up at a rapid pace. Nursery Hill's two stores and post office were moved to the new town, and on March 6, 1872, the post office became 'Syracuse' again. Incorporation was accomplished on January 6, 1875.
 
Syracuse also grew as an agricultural center. In 1878 over 350 cars of grain and 100 carloads of livestock were shipped from this station. The original town was built primarily on the bottomland near the tracks, but it gradually moved to the higher ground. By 1879 the population was upwards of 500 residents, and in 1882 over 80 services were listed, including a carriage factory. A stone quarry was developed five miles from Syracuse. Some of its light-gray stone was used to build the state penitentiary at Lincoln." (1)
 
 
Cemeteries:
 
 
Fairview-Dudley Cemetery
 
 
Park Hill Cemetery
 
North Branch Lutheran Cemetery
 
Warner Cemetery
 
 
Churches:
 
Syracuse-Townshipelement2701162 Mohawk St.
Syracuse, NE 68446
(402) 269-2360
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Syracuse-Townshipelement271700 Plum St.
Syracuse, NE 68446
(402) 269-2562
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Syracuse-Townshipelement272863 5th St.
Syracuse, NE 68446
(402) 269-3382
 
Syracuse-Townshipelement273100 Parker Dr.
Syracuse, NE 68446
(402) 269-2205
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
Syracuse-Townshipelement274560 6th St.
Syracuse, NE 68446
(402) 269-2161
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Historical Attractions:
 
Syracuse-Townshipelement290366 Poplar St.
Syracuse, NE 68446
(402) 269-2355
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History:
 
 
 
Libraries:
 
Syracuse-Townshipelement300496 6th St.
Syracuse, NE 68446
(402) 269-2336
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Mortuaries:
 
644 Park St.
Syracuse, NE 68446
(402) 269-2441
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Organizations:
 
American Legion Post #100
527 5th Street
Syracuse, Nebraska  68446
 
Lions Club #13428
303 Railroad Ave.
Syracuse, NE 68446
 
Mount Moriah Masonic Lodge #57
281 5th St.
Syracuse, NE 68446
 
Mid-County VFW Post #5547
527 5th St
Syracuse, NE 68446
(402) 269-3231
 
 
Publications:
 
"For the Record - The Centennial History of Syracuse, Nebraska"
Written by Otoe County historian, Margaret Dale Masters, this 150-page publications documents Syracuse's history from 1871 to 1971.  Includes many names from the past 100 years of Syracuse's existence.
 
 
"Keeping A Roof Over Their Heads"
This publication documents the history of the Syracuse-Dunbar-Avoca Public Schools and covers many names of the teachers and students who attended these schools.
 
*Both of these publications can be purchased through a donation to the Otoe County Museum of Memories.  Please contact the museum for further details.
 
Otoe County Museum of Memories
366 Poplar St.
Syracuse, NE 68446
Phone: (402) 269-2355
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Web Links:
 
 
 
 
Works Cited:
 

(1) CASDE | Syracuse -- Otoe County." CASDE | Virtual Nebraska. University of Nebraska - Lincoln, 2005. Web. 25 July 2010.

 

 

Village of Palmyra

P.O. Box 158
425 C Street
Palmyra, NE 68418
(402) 780-5531
Michele Lincoln - Clerk
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Office Hours:
Monday through Friday

8:00AM - 12:00PM/1:00PM - 5:00PM

 

 


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"On gently rolling hills near the Little Nemaha Creek, our town was platted in 1870 on land belonging to Rev. John M. Taggart, a Baptist minister. Taggart, who arrived early in 1856, was also an architect, stone cutter, and served in the territorial legislature. Early activities included a Sabbath school, "...held in an old log schoolhouse in 1856, Rev. Webb officiating."
 
As pioneers settled along the cut-off trail from Nebraska City to Fort Kearny, a post office was requested. Established on June 20, 1862, it took its name from the ancient city of Palmyra in Asia Minor. Prior to this, mail was brought to J. R. McKee's farm by the stagecoach. McKee's great-granddaughter, Barbara Fey, served ten years as Palmyra's postmaster, retiring in 1989 after 30 years of postal service.
 
A "real town" started to take shape when the Midland Pacific Railway was being built parallel to the old trail in 1870-71. When platted, a four-square-block village park was dedicated and named Taggart Park in his honor. Oakley's built a general store, Sylvanus Brown established a hardware store, which included a stock of agricultural implements, and Foster & Garnett also erected a store. Viola Campbell built the first home in the spring of 1870, at which time the post office was moved to her home and run by her daughter. When the first train arrived in April 1871, Palmyra was well established.
 
In 1873, with the help of local farmers and citizens -- each subscribing $1,500 toward construction -- Gualt & Powell built a mill. The following year, using a windmill for power, a machine shop and elevator was established. A larger schoolhouse was also built in 1874 at a cost of $3,300.
 
Palmyra's first library, located in the town hall basement, was destroyed by fire on December 24, 1913. Moved to space above the drug store, it was again burned (along with many other buildings) in 1914. The Woman's Club decided that a fire-proof library should be built, a structure which is still being used.
 
For many years, Palmyra's premier event was a day-long picnic. First suggested by settler Edwin Baldwin in 1870 "...to welcome the many new settlers to the area," it was formally organized in 1887 as the Old Settlers' Association. Held at J. R. McKee's grove just south of town until 1899, the gathering grew of over 10,000 persons, many of whom arrived on special trains that offered reduced rates for the event. It was moved to the village park, where a big tent could shelter people from the sun. There were bands, races, contests, and "...plenty of food, music, and political speakers."
 
A "big affair" was featured at the 1933 picnic, when a monument was dedicated on the Douglas Road south of town, marking the early westward trail from Nebraska City to Denver. Built from stones gathered from the foundation of the Oakley store, a bronze plaque commemorates "...the second night stop" along that trail. For the 100th anniversary of the event, observed June 13-14, 1987, Palmyra's senior citizen, 96-year-old Dick Nash, was chosen Grand Marshal of the "Parade of the Century.
 
Other excitement in bygone days was provided by baseball games and horse races. It is said that Palmyra had two real-good race tracks.
 
Today over 500 people call Palmyra home. A housing development, started in the 1970s, provided for new growth. Our businesses include a grocery store, a bank, a farmers' co-op, numerous small shops, and gas stations. The school district, which consolidated with Bennet in 1869, remodeled its facilities in 1982. The Senior Citizens' Activities Center, built in 1984, attracts senior diners daily and is available for other activities in the evening.
 
Volunteers provide fire protection for the town and rural residents, and have formed a quick-response medical squad. Volunteers also support year-round athletic programs that ranges from kid's T-Ball to adult co-ed volleyball. Others deliver meals-on-wheels, care for plants around town, publish a monthly village newsletter, and provide fun and educational programs for all ages.  These are the things that help make our town, Palmyra, a nice place to live and grow." (1)
 
 
Cemeteries:
 
Bunten Cemetery
 
Old Palmyra Cemetery
 
Rosewood Cemetery
 
St. Leo's Catholic Cemetery
 
Spahnle Family Cemetery
 
Thomson Family Cemetery
 
 
Palmyra-Townshipelement260Churches:
 
955 'C' St.
Palmyra, NE 68418
(402) 780-5668
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Palmyra-Townshipelement261P.O. Box 160
625 Illinois Pl.
Palmyra, NE 68418
 
Palmyra-Townshipelement262535 'C' St.
Palmyra, NE 68418
(402) 263-2615
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
Palmyra-Townshipelement263330 W. 8th St.
Palmyra, NE 68418-2537
(402) 780-5535
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History:
 
 
 
Palmyra-Townshipelement270Libraries:
 
535 Illinois Place
Palmyra, NE 68418-3046
(402) 780-5344
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Organizations:
 
Palmyra-Townshipelement280Union Masonic Lodge #287
340 'C' St.
Palmyra, NE 68418
 
 
Web Links:
 
 
 
 
Works Cited:
 

(1) CASDE | Palmyra -- Otoe County." CASDE | Virtual Nebraska. University of Nebraska - Lincoln, 2005. Web. 20 September 2010.

Village of Otoe

Otoe-Townshipelement24PO Box 91
314 N. Locust St.
Otoe, NE 68417
(402) 265-2211
Deana Bennett - Clerk
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Office Hours:
Monday through Friday

8:00AM - 12:00PM/1:00PM - 5:00PM

 

 


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"Otoe is a small town in Otoe County. Located 18 miles northwest of Nebraska City, it is just 40 miles southeast of Lincoln and 50 miles south of Omaha. Otoe typifies today's trend to peaceful small-town living and access to larger cities for employment and entertainment.
 
Berlin precinct, established early in territorial days, was probably named for pioneer and Civil War veteran E. D. Berlin. Churches and schools were the first concern of the early settlers, who were primarily of German descent. In 1860 -- long before we were a town -- a Methodist church had been founded. County records list District 78 in the school census in 1876, with a schoolhouse just west of the present town site. A Lutheran church was established in 1878.
 
Our town was founded in 1880 by Aureluis Bowen, who owned 160 acres in Berlin Precinct. At that time, the Missouri Pacific Railroad was building its line from Kansas City to Omaha. Bowen gave 20 acres to the railroad, and another 20 acres to a town, which he called "Berlin." The original plat -- only four blocks square -- was quickly outgrown, so the first of several additions were made.
 
The first passenger train made its entry in 1883. The railroad was an important part of our village life, with two passenger and two freights every day. The old schoolhouse had been moved into Berlin when the town was established. Soon, a larger school built and a high school was added. In January 1896, when the population reached the required 200, Berlin incorporated.
 
Our town has survived a number of disasters. The 1913 Easter Sunday tornado did great damage to our town. The entire business district was destroyed and 75 homes were in shambles. After flattening Berlin, the storm ripped through several other towns on its way to Omaha where hundreds of people were killed. The citizens of Berlin gathered up the pieces and rebuilt.
 
Then, in 1918, numerous fires "broke out" along Berlin's main street. After a full block was destroyed, thought to have been because of the intense anti-German feelings during World War I, a group of citizens petitioned to the town's name changed to "something else." The name "Otoe" was chosen, and became official on October 18, 1918, less than a month before the end of the war. (Postal records show no other town by that name in the United States.)
 
In the 1920s, Otoe was a thriving town with two churches, a bank, two grocery stores, a light plant, two elevators, a butcher shop, a hardware store, a blacksmith, a newspaper, a livery stable, and two barber shops. Even though passenger train service was discontinued in 1932, Otoe's population peaked in 1940 with 298 citizens. After World War II, various shifts in both the rural and urban population occurred so that in 1958 the high school closed its doors. The railroad abandoned this branch of its line in 1960.
 
There have been many changes since then. Today Otoe has a population of 196. Still governed by a five-member board of trustees, the community supports a 14-member volunteer fire department, with a nine-member quick response team, and a K-8 elementary school. A new Lutheran church was built in 1971 to replace the structure destroyed by fire earlier that year. In addition to our post office, we have a grocery-catering service, two taverns with eating facilities, a radio and TV shop, a construction company, a small plant that manufactures car crushers, a plumbing shop, and an elevator.
 
Otoe has a very nice park. The ball diamond was dedicated in 1982, in connection with the Otoe centennial celebration. An annual barbecue is held the second Saturday in September as a community-wide project, with proceeds going to benefit the community. A booklet written for the centennial provides more details about our town, Otoe."
 
By Verena Paap and Loris Roettger, Box 85, Otoe, NE 68417. (1)
 
 
Cemeteries:
 
 
Holy Trinity Catholic Cemetery
 
North Branch Lutheran Cemetery
 
Otoe (Union) Cemetery
 
Whitten Family Cemetery
 
 
Otoe-Townshipelement280Churches:
 
St. John's Lutheran Church
726 2nd St.
Otoe, NE 68417-8848
(402) 265-2901
 
 
History:
 
 
 
 
 
Works Cited:
 

(1) CASDE | Otoe -- Otoe County." CASDE | Virtual Nebraska. University of Nebraska - Lincoln, 2005. Web. 23 October 2010.

City of Nebraska City

1409 Central Avenue
Nebraska City, NE  68410
IMG 0374Phone: (402)-873-5515
 
Office Hours:
Monday to Friday
8:00AM to 5:00PM
 
 
 
Otoe County
017Courthouse
 
1021 Central Avenue
Nebraska City, NE  68410
Phone: (402)873-9505
Clerk: Janene Bennett
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Office Hours:
Monday to Friday

8:00AM to 4:30PM

 

 


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"Early exploration was reported in 1804 by Lewis and Clark as they journeyed west along the Missouri River. Nebraska City was the original site of Old Fort Kearny, a military post used by the government in 1846. It was abandoned several years later and relocated to central Nebraska, now south of present day Kearney, Nebraska.
 
Shortly after the post was vacated, John Boulware developed an important river-crossing and ferry service from Iowa across to present day Nebraska City. He and his father grew their business and built a ferry house, the first residence in Nebraska City in 1852 or 1853. Slaves were first bought and sold in the 1850s in Nebraska City.[4]
 
In 1854 the Kansas-Nebraska Act allowed legal settlement in the regional area. Three townships were incorporated by settlers: Nebraska City and Kearney City were incorporated in 1855, and South Nebraska City was incorporated in 1856. During those years Nebraska City competed fiercely to become the Nebraska Territory capital. On December 31, 1857, these three town sites along with Prairie City joined, incorporating as present day Nebraska City. Before the Civil War, Nebraska City was also noted as having the Territory's largest population of slaves.
 
In the mid 1800s, steamboats were the vitalizing force behind Nebraska City’s growth in bringing commerce, people and freight to the west. In the spring of 1858 Russell, Majors and Waddell started freighting from Nebraska City on a government contract to transport all provisions for all western forts. The supplies were brought up the Missouri River by steamboat and then taken out by wagon train. Nebraska City's favorable position (with a gradual slope from the river to the table land above) and good trail made it an important link to the west.
 
Since that beginning, the city was established as a regional transportation, economic, and agriculture hub for the three state area. Additional forms of transportation were important including the steam wagon and the first locomotive engine of the Midland Pacific.
 
J. Sterling Morton came to Nebraska City in 1855 to edit the Nebraska City News. He and his wife Caroline were originally from Michigan and they were lovers of nature. Morton served as Secretary of Agriculture under President Grover Cleveland’s administration and he was instrumental in establishing the annual tree planting day, Arbor Day in 1872. Governor Robert Furnas issued the first Arbor Day Proclamation on March 31, 1874. The holiday is celebrated around the world." (1)
 
 
Cemeteries:
 
Camp Creek Cemetery
 
Cowles Hill Cemetery
 
 
 
Harry Novak Burial Site
 
Old Wyoming Cemetery
 
St. Benedict's Cemetery
 
St. Mary's Catholic Cemetery
 
Warden Cemetery
 
Wyuka Cemetery
 
 
Churches:
 
Nebraska-City-Townshipelement260Bethel United Church of Christ
2400 W. Central Ave
Nebraska City, NE 68410
Phone: 402-873-6218
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
Nebraska-City-Townshipelement261Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints
920 Centennial Avenue
Nebraska City, NE 68410-1052
(402) 873-3500
 
Nebraska-City-Townshipelement262First Baptist Church
302 South 7th Street
Nebraska City, NE 68410-2836
(402) 873-3726
 
1005 1st Corso
Nebraska City, NE 68410-2324
(402) 873-5306
 
1023 1st Avenue
Nebraska City, NE 68410-2315
(402) 873-3821
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411 5th Rue
Nebraska City, NE 68410
(402) 873-3047
 
218 North 6th Street
Nebraska City, NE 68410-2430
(402) 873-3024
 
Nebraska-City-Townshipelement266St. Mary's Episcopal Church
116 South 9th Street
Nebraska City, NE 68410-2403
(402) 873-5334
 
 
 
Family History Center:
 
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints
920 Centennial Avenue
Nebraska-City-Townshipelement261Nebraska City, NE 68410-1052
(402) 873-3500
Hours: Wed. 7-9pm, or by appointment
*Call Michelle at (402) 874-1122
 
 
Historical Attractions:
 
Nebraska-City-Townshipelement2702600 Arbor Avenue
Nebraska City, NE 68410
(402) 873-7222
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Nebraska-City-Townshipelement271910 First Corso
Nebraska City, NE 68410
(402) 873-4018
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Nebraska-City-Townshipelement2722012 4th Corso
Nebraska City, NE 68410
(402) 873-3115
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Nebraska-City-Townshipelement273100 Valmont Drive
Nebraska City, NE  68410
(402) 874-9900
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Nebraska-City-Townshipelement2741320 Central Avenue
Nebraska City, Ne 68410
(402) 873-4403
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Nebraska-City-Townshipelement276407 N. 14th Street
Nebraska City, NE 68410
(402) 873-9360
 
Nebraska-City-Townshipelement277711 3rd Corso
Nebraska City, NE 68410
(402) 873-9360
 
Nebraska-City-Townshipelement275420 Steinhart Park Road
Nebraska City, NE 68410
(402) 873-6340
 
 
History:
 
 
 
Library:
 
Nebraska-City-Townshipelement280923 First Corso
Nebraska City, NE 68410
(402) 873-5609
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Mortuaries:
 
Nebraska-City-Townshipelement312403 S. 9th Street
Nebraska City, NE 68410
(402) 873-6011
 
Peterson Mortuary
Nebraska-City-Townshipelement310111 N 11th St
Nebraska City, NE 68410
402-873-6626
 
 
Organizations:
 
P.O. Box 692
Nebraska City , NE 68410
 
600 1st Corso
Nebraska City, NE 68410
(402) 873-6446
 
Nebraska-City-Townshipelement290Western Star Masonic Lodge #2
1104 Central Avenue
Nebraska City, NE 68410
 
 
 
Publications:
 
"Wyuka A place of rest; Nebraska City's Pioneer Cemetery"
 
Wyuka Cemetery in Nebraska City is one of the state's oldest
cemeteries. Filled with unique gravestones, the stories of those
buried beneath the earth are just as unique, and forever intertwined with the history of Nebraska City.  These are but a few of the stories.  This book was written by Wyuka Cemetery historian, Donald Hegr, and sells for $21.35 ($19.95 + $1.40 sales tax). 
 
Books can be purchased at the Nebraska City city hall.  For more information, please contact Victoria at (402) 873-5515.
 
 
Rural Schools:
 
Harmony School (District 53) Link to be updated
6265 'Q' Road
Nebraska-City-Townshipelement340Nebraska City , NE 68410
(402) 242-2951
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Web Links:
 
 
 
 
Works Cited:
 

(1) "Nebraska City, Nebraska." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. 26 May 2010. Web. 16 June 2010.

Village of Lorton

tumblr lqcv3nsgtc1qhm1ppo1 500Village Clerk
#3 2nd St.
Lorton, NE 68346
402-259-2330
Jeri L. Rowen - Clerk
 
 
 
 


View Larger Map

 
 
"Platted in 1881, our town was given the name "Delta." Its post office was established on June 26, 1882. When the Missouri Pacific Railway built a north-south connecting line from Talmage to Weeping Water, it came right through Delta.
 
While establishing the right-of-way, however, railroad officials informed the town that its name had to be changed since it had a station by that name in Kansas. While everyone was happy to get a railroad, no one wanted to change the name of the town, so no action was taken. The railroad -- determined in their decision -- chose its own name for the station, calling it "Cio."
 
For several years, the town had two names. The post office had no problem with the original name, since the other Delta was in another state. Mail was addressed to Delta, but freight had to be directed to Cio. When traveling, passengers also had to remember to identify their destination by its station name -- not that of the town. This was obviously a very confusing situation.
 
In time, the people decided to find a name that would be acceptable to all. Robert Lorton, a wholesale grocery salesman from Nebraska City who called on local merchants at that time, was well-liked, and since there were no other towns by that name in Nebraska or on the MP line, the people chose the name "Lorton." On November 6, 1894, the name -- approved by both the federal and railroad authorities -- was officially changed.
 
During its first 25 years, Lorton was a thriving railroad town, with four trains a day. The 1900 census lists the village with a population of 290. There was a Baptist church, an opera house, a hotel, a bank, a doctor's office, a blacksmith shop, two grocery stores (one with general merchandise), a pharmacist, a hardware store, a lumberyard, a livery stable, two taverns, a millinery shop, a dressmaking establishment, a harness shop, two elevators, and a stockyard.
 
Because of its location away from major east-west routes, Lorton became pretty-much a self contained community. At one time, over 60 children were enrolled in Lorton's school. As roads improved, and the economy of the state and nation changed, the need for the railroad and railroad-towns diminished. A number of businesses that closed during the 1930s and World War II did not reopen. When the 1950 flood washed out the tracks, it ended train service to Lorton and the elevator closed.
 
Today, Lorton has a population of 45. The post office is located in the grocery store, and we have a garage and repair shop, a tavern, and the Otoe County bridge equipment storage building. The town board, Chairman Ricci Landwehr, and members Judy Teten, David Goeden, Howard Hogankamp, and Lela Goeden, meet regularly at the town hall to provide for the needs of the citizens.
 
For many years the young people moved away to find employment in larger towns. Recently, younger families with small children have moved to Lorton. Now, as the older citizens move away, new people are purchasing homes and taking an interest in the small-town life.
 
This is giving new life to our town, and helps Lorton to grow again."
 
By Norma J. Castle, Village Clerk, Lorton, NE 68382 (1)
 
 
Cemeteries:
 
Biggs Cemetery - to be linked
 
St. John's UCC (McWilliams) Cemetery - to be linked
 
 
St. John s United Church of ChristChurches:
 
St. John's United Church of Christ
4403 'O' Rd.
Talmage, NE 68448
(402) 259-4215
 
 
History:
 
 
 
 
Works Cited:
 

(1) CASDE | Lorton -- Otoe County." CASDE | Virtual Nebraska. University of Nebraska - Lincoln, 2005. Web. 26 April 2011.

Genealogy Events

 

 Program Ideas - Come & share with us!!!  We want to make the Society interesting to all Otoe County area residents or descendants of Otoe County Pioneers!!

Thursday, August 10th - 6:00PM - Brown Bag Lunch -  Brief Meeting - selecting Nomination Committee and Finance Meeting - Unadilla Resource Room.  Please come and give OCGS your input and interest for future activities/programs!

Saturday, August 19th - 9AM Lewis & Clark Center - Nebraska City - Group will meet east of the Syracuse Public Library and car pool from there.  Lunch Downtown Nebraska City.

Saturday, September 23rd 10AM - Osage Cemetery tour & Brown Bag Lunch

Saturday, October 21st, 9AM - Meeting.  10AM - Program - preserving Old Photographs, Unadilla Resource Room

Saturday, November 18th, 9:30AM Election of Officers, 2018-2020, Potluck Lunch.  Unadilla Resource Room.

 
 

Syracuse Museum of Memories - Looking for Volunteers.  They meet every Wednesday, 9AM.  Open every Sunday afternoon - May-October, else by Appointment.  See their page on our site for further details. 

 

Meeting Minutes

May 2017 Meeting Minutes - Click HERE for the minutes.

April 2017 Meeting Minutes - Click HERE for the minutes.

February 2017 Meeting Minutes - Click HERE for the minutes.

November 2016 Meeting Minutes - Click HERE for the minutes.

June 11, 2016 Meeting Minutes - Click HERE for the minutes

May 21, 2016 Meeting Minutes - Click HERE for the Minutes.

April 23, 2016 Meeting Minutes - Click HERE for the Minutes

March 12, 2016 Meeting Minutes - Click HERE for the Minutes.

February 20, 2016 Meeting Minutes - click here for the minutes.

January  9, 2016 Meeting Minutes - click here for the minutes.